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Specifically launched during Latino Heritage Month 2015, Es Mi Cultura is a monthly newsletter that provides readers with positive examples of women who proudly acknowledge their African ancestry, while staying true to their Latino ethnicity and culture.

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April 2018 ~ Issue 31


Our names are Lina and Estephanie and we are two Dominican Afro-Latinx podcasters. We were both born and raised in the Bronx and have been friends since we were 10-years-old. Lina is currently living in Philadelphia where she is attending law school and Estephanie is a Bronx based artist and aspiring graphic novelist.


As Afro-Latinx people, we are erased in the media and people often act like we don’t exist. We use our podcast to elevate and bring awareness to our experiences as Black Latinx womxn. Due to the pervasive Anti-Blackness in our Latinx communities, it can be very hard to embrace our Black identities. We want to challenge ourselves and our communities to know that Black is beautiful and universal.



In 2015 we decided there was a huge lack of representation for Black Latinx voices in the podcasting world and we created Bag Ladiez!



Read Issue 31


March 2018 ~ Issue 30


Daily Baez from Dailycurlz is a freelance writer and a content creator. Her natural casual lifestyle fuses the way to love herself and helps others do the same. Born and raised in Dominican Republic, and based in Los Angeles, her bilingual versatility is credited to her upbringing and appreciation for new experiences.

"Running and maintaining my site has been a wonderful way to allow me to pursue my interest in blogging. This came when I stopped using relaxer on my hair and I started to post a lot about hair on my personal Facebook page. One friend told me that he should unfriend me, because all I do is talk about hair. That night I opened a Facebook page and since I had so much to say, I started my blog on April 3, 2011. My blog is a digital version of a scrapbook, chronicling my journey into a healthier me, my lifestyle with a curly twists, and my mixed heritage."


February 2018 ~ Issue 29




As Afro descendants it's important to acknowledge and celebrate everyone from the diaspora who has made significant contributions to the world as we know it.

In honor of Black History Month, Es Mi Cultura shines a light on four prominent Afro-Latinos who impacted or changed the course of history.

Happy Black History Month

January 2018 ~ Issue 28

"My name is Suyent Rodriguez and I am a Black Latina. I was born in La Habana, Cuba and immigrated with my parents to Albuquerque, NM in 2005. My parents are small business owners—they own a beauty salon in Albuquerque where they work.

I reigned as Miss Black New Mexico USA 2016 and participated in the national completion (Miss Black USA) where I made it to finals. I am a spoken word poet and speak to my own experiences. You can listen to my poem about my Afro-Latina identity by following this link: https://youtu.be/FBo-HEuXwsw

I studied Psychology and Africana Studies at the University of New Mexico where I earned a Bachelor of Arts in May of 2017. I am currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Pan African Studies at Syracuse University in Syracuse, NY. I am static to be conducting original research about the African diaspora this summer.

I recently opened an Etsy shop with conscious shirts. You can access my shop through this link: https://www.etsy.com/shop/DeGuarapo

I am also working on two socially conscious projects: building ways to promote cultural exchange between Afro America and Afro Cuba, and promoting the embracing of natural hair in the island."


Read Issue 28

December 2017 ~ Issue 27

Kayla Zapata Fory ~ Afro-Colombian from California

"I love to travel and learning from other cultures. Naturally, I studied International Relations: Economic Development and Spanish at Tufts University in Boston. The summer after graduating, I attended the UN Youth Summit and interned with international humanitarian organization Catholic Relief Service. I wanted to continue exploring my interest in innovative approaches to sustainable development in the Global South.

I moved to Ghana to assist social enterprises on the ground that were merging business strategy with community-based solutions. I interned with the Kokrobite Institute that was creating sustainable educational materials out of recycled waste and conducting teacher training workshops for local schools. While living in Accra, I developed an interest in the vibrant West-Africa textiles and ease of creating bespoke tailored clothes. I changed projects to join an ethical fashion house called Studio One Eighty Nine, run by fellow Afro-Latina Rosario Dawson and Bottega Veneta executive Abrima Erwiah, that was supporting West African artisan communities. The start-up life pushed me to grow and take on several new responsibilities in finance and marketing. I learned how to pitch and manage photo shoots among other practical business skills. While abroad, I started a bilingual traveling blog called Tejiendo Experiences and am currently working on a new website to refine my content and share how Latin American culture still carries strong ties to Africa.

I am creating a new blog to share my travel experiences around the world focusing on Latin America and Africa. I will be reflecting about living abroad and sharing the various travel tips I have learned while abroad. There are many countries that I have visited, but have not yet posted about - so there are more cuentos up my sleeve. I will also be posting about Afro-Latina and will be posting about the Afro-Latina events around town. I am also super excited to start a new job at Instagram with Facebook HQ in the San Francisco Bay Area. I want to continue to try to connect and create space for Afro-Latina narratives, so stay tuned!"





November 2017 ~ Issue 26



Lido Pimienta is a Toronto-based, Afro-Indigenous, of the Wayuu people in la Guajira, Colombia, interdisciplinary musician and artist-curator. She has performed, exhibited, and curated around the world since 2002, exploring the politics of gender, race, motherhood, identity and the construct of the Canadian landscape in the Latin American diaspora and vernacular.

Lido’s latest LP La Papessa (2016), charts an evolution from her debut LP Color (2010), an album full of (as the title suggests) colorful landscapes and positive vibrations. The 2017 Polaris Prize-winning album, La Papessa, takes a more personal approach, describing the narrative of how Lido has found her independence as a woman and as an artist who refuses to fit pre-conceived notions of what a pop Latina artist ought to be.

The album was written in multiple cultural and geographic settings - the desert of Indigenous Wayuu land and the northern mountains in Colombia, as well as in Canada, in both London and Toronto, Ontario - and the music, in turn, reflects these settings. The sounds on La Papessa take listeners on a musical journey from traditional Afro-Colombian percussion to global bass and darker avant-garde electronic sounds. Lido’s piercing, explosive and heartwarming voice unites the compositions, beats and harmonies, resulting in a perfect labour of love and sound that highlights the creative voice of this talented artist.

Read Issue 26

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